Country

Name
UK  
Region
Europe (EU)  
National System of the Education and MET

4.  2.1 National system of the education

(http://www.studyabroad.pk/guides/study-in-uk/education-system-in-uk)

 

 

 
Academic MET

1 Southampton Solent University

Undergraduate courses

 

Maritime Industry degrees

 BEng (Hons) Marine Engineering and Management

 BSc (Hons) Marine Operations Management

 BSc (Hons) Maritime Business

BSc (Hons) Shipping and Port Management

 FdEng Marine Electrical and Electronic Engineering

 FdEng Marine Engineering

 FdSc Marine Operations

 

Yacht and Boat Design degrees

 BEng (Hons) Yacht and Powercraft Design

 BEng (Hons) Yacht Design and Production

3.1 U.K. Maritime University

 

 

2 Liverpool John Moores University

 

FACULTIES

 

Marine Operations

Moving consumer goods in containers, vehicles on car decks or passengers on sundecks relies on the expertise and professionalism of ships’ officers to bring them safely to port. Ships’ officers and their teams are responsible for tens of millions of pounds worth of sophisticated vessel and cargo.

This unique programme qualifies you for a position as Deck Officer and eventually Captain of a commercial ship. On top of your degree you will need to do further short courses, exams and time at sea to achieve Officer of the Watch and ultimately, Chief Mate and Master Mariner qualifications.

Successfully completing the foundation degree is the fastest way to obtain the OOW certificate but you can 'top up' your FdSc to a full BSc (Hons) by continuing your studies for a further nine months on our BSc (Hons) Nautical Science degree.

The work-based modules of this course are completed at sea working for a commercial shipping company and account for approximately half of your degree programme.

We have a proud tradition of teaching maritime and nautical studies at LJMU, having originally provided courses as Liverpool Nautical College. However this course is firmly focused on the present and future needs of the industry with its state-of-the-art facilities including the UK’s only 360-degree ship bridge simulator system and teaching from staff with extensive industrial experience.

Teaching at the University is via a combination of lectures, interactive seminars and informal small-group tutorials, accounting for 15-16 hours of your weekly study time. In addition you will be expected to spend at least 34-35 hours in private study. Online learning materials can be accessed any time from our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, and our Learning Resource Centre so you can study at a time and pace to suit you.

Work-based learning modules are completed at sea for three months at Level 4 and then for 13 months in Levels 5 to 6, followed by a two-month course to prepare you for the OOW exam.

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course.

Maritime Business and Management

Most consumer goods have spent part of their journey from factory to shop on board a ship. The business of shipping is therefore pivotal to the world economy and spans a number of disciplines including commerce, economics, law, logistics and management. What’s more, job opportunities are numerous, whether you aspire to work in a business environment or closer to the world of ships and ports and - because this is an international job market - it could potentially take you all over the world.

This course has been designed for those who desire an in-depth knowledge of the maritime business world. With its law and business content, you will gain an understanding of this fascinating sector.

We have a proud tradition of teaching maritime studies at LJMU, having originally provided courses as Liverpool Nautical College. However this course is firmly focused on the present and future needs of the maritime industry, with its state-of-the-art facilities, teaching from staff with extensive industrial experience and exciting work placement opportunities.

Teaching is via a combination of lectures, interactive seminars and informal small-group tutorials, accounting for 14-15 hours of your weekly study time. In addition, you will be expected to spend at least 35 hours in private study. The balance of classroom to private study time alters once you reach your final year so that you can spend more time learning independently. Online learning materials can be accessed any time from our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, and our library so you can study at a time and pace to suit you.

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course.

 

Mechanical and Marine Engineering

If you enjoy solving problems and relish the idea of working as part of a professional team of naval architects, electrical engineers and marine scientists to provide mechanical solutions, this could be the course for you. It will give you an in-depth understanding of the scientific principles and advanced design technology as well as the problem solving and management skills required to be a successful marine engineer.

This is one of the UK’s leading engineering schools, with a supportive staff team and excellent facilities, including engine test facilities, materials testing laboratories and digital design studios, which you have full use of in practical sessions. Links with national and international companies such as Bibby Line, Rolls Royce, Shell and Castrol mean that the course is tailored to the needs of employers and as an extension of this, we offer you the chance to undertake a year’s paid placement.

Teaching is via a combination of lectures supported by small-group tutorials, seminars and practical sessions. Initially formal teaching accounts for 23 hours of your week, but decreases to 13 hours as the course progresses and independent study time increases from 27 to 37 hours per week. In your first year, a three-day field trip to the Centre for Alternative Technology in mid-Wales will give you a chance to do some experimental work as well as getting to know staff and other students on your course.

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course.

Nautical Science

Moving consumer goods in containers, vehicles on car decks, or passengers on sundecks relies on the expertise and professionalism of ships’ officers to bring them safely to port. Ships’ officers and their teams are responsible for tens of millions of pounds worth of sophisticated vessel and cargo.

This unique programme qualifies you for a position as deck officer and eventually captain of a commercial ship. On top of your degree you will need to do further short courses, exams and time at sea to achieve Officer of the Watch and ultimately, Chief Mate and Master Mariner qualifications. The work-based modules of this course are completed at sea working for a commercial shipping company, and account for approximately half of the degree programme.

We have a proud tradition of teaching maritime and nautical studies at LJMU, having originally provided courses as Liverpool Nautical College. However this course is firmly focused on the present and future needs of the industry with its state-of-the-art facilities, including the UK’s only 360-degree ship’s bridge simulator system and teaching from staff with extensive industrial experience.

Teaching at the University is via a combination of lectures, interactive seminars and informal small-group tutorials, accounting for 14-15 hours of your weekly study time. In addition you will be expected to spend at least 30-35 hours in private study. Online learning materials can be accessed any time from our virtual learning environment, Blackboard, and our library so you can study at a time and pace to suit you. Work-based learning modules are completed at sea for three months in Level 4 and then for 16 months from Levels 5 to 6, including some leave and professional short courses. Once you have completed your degree programme, there will be a two-month course to prepare you for the OOW exam.

The modules listed below are examples from the last academic year. There may be some changes before you start your course.

 
Non-academic MET
 
Differences in Natinal MET
 
Statistics of National MET