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University Description

Country
Croatia  
Name
University of Rijeka, Faculty of Maritime Studies  
General Information

Name of the Institution:

University of Rijeka Faculty of Maritime Studies Rijeka

Dean:

Prof. Ser?o Kos, Ph. D.

Address:

Studentska 2, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia

Phone/ number:

+385 (0)51 211046    

Fax number:

+385 (0)51 336755

e-mail:

dekanat@pfri.hr

URL:

http://www.pfri.uniri.hr/

 

The Faculty of Maritime Studies Rijeka is situated very close to the centre of the town. It can be reached on foot from the railway or the bus station, or from the harbour in a very short time.

Following the process of quality awareness, in 2001 the Faculty gained ISO 9001:2000 certificate of quality issued by the national and international classification societies (Croatian Register of Shipping and Bureau Veritas). Again, in the following years recertification was carried through again. 

The Faculty of Maritime Studies, University of Rijeka, was founded in 1949 under the name of the Merchant Marine Training College of Rijeka. It was the first maritime education and training institution of higher education in Croatia.

 

  1. Maritime education & training:
    • MET of marine officers under STCW 1995 Convention
    • opportunity for maritime officers to achieve academic degree
    • education and training of academically and vocationally qualified personnel for the management level in:
      • maritime administration, coastguard & harbormaster’s offices
      • shipping companies, ports and ports authorities, shipbuilding and port industry
      • shipping & forwarding agencies
      • logistics of maritime transportation
      • protection of the marine environment
      • inland waterways operation & administration, land and intermodal transportation
  2. Projects and feasibility studies for the Croatian Maritime Administration, shipping industry, ports, etc.
  3. R & D in the maritime industry

The Faculty of Maritime Studies is recognized for high quality teaching and research. It is committed to achieving standards of excellence. The Faculty stands to the national code of good teaching in maritime education and training institutions. Over the last fifty-five years the Faculty has been involved in curriculum reforms following advances in theory and practice. The Faculty of Maritime Studies’ programmes are confirmed by the rigorous process of external accreditation. 

In 1978 the College was transformed into the Faculty of Maritime Studies and joined the University of Rijeka, offering both diploma and B.Sc courses in maritime and transport studies. Since 1982 the Faculty has run M.Sc and PhD courses in maritime and transport studies. 

 

2.6. Training facilities and equipment

 

The Faculty runs simulators, workshops and specialized classrooms as part of regular and additional courses of training:

 

Simulators:

 

Nautical Simulators:

  • TRANSAS MARINE NAVI-TRAINER PROFESSIONAL - 4000, full mission bridge navigational simulator with on-screen projection 180 deg.

 

Engine Room Simulators:

  • TRANSAS ERS 4000 ver. 7.3
  • Norcontrol DPS 100 Diesel Engine Simulator
  • Norcontrol PPT 2000 SIMULATOR
  • Norcontrol Cargo handling simulator (oil tankers) GMDSS station

 

 

Specialized classrooms(labs, computer facilities, etc.)

  • Nautical
  • Computer Lab
  • Language Lab (PC & video)
  • Reefer Lab
  • Loadmaster

 

 

2.6.1. Navigational simulator- Navi-Trainer Professional 4000 (NTPRO 4000)

 

Navigational simulator Navi-Trainer Professional 4000 (NTPRO 4000) enables simulator training and certification of watch officers, chief officers, captains and pilots serving on commercial and fishing ships with the gross tonnage of 500 tons and more. This complies with requirements of IMO STCW 78/95 Convention and Model Courses 7.01, 7.03 as well as number of specific tasks beyond the Convention. Simulator incorporated also the Transas GMDSS Simulator, VTS simulator, and possibility of join venture with ERS 4000 simulator.

NTPRO 4000 simulator is certified by DNV as Class A simulator.

 

Conventional training

  • Ship handling training in accordance with STCW’95 requirements (Bridge Team Management, Bridge Resource Management, ARPA/Radar, ECDIS, AIS, …)

Special training

  • Ship handling training in ice conditions;
  • Training for naval applications;

Vessel traffic management training in accordance with IALA V 103 standard for the certification and training of VTS personnel;

 

      

 

2.6.2. Engine Room Simulators

 

The Faculty of Maritime Studies has got its primary mission to educate and train students. An essential training segment takes place at engine room simulators. The simulators are designed for training the students for proper skills when operating the ship propulsion plant, preparing and putting into operation machinery and systems; monitor their operation by measured parameters with the aid of the alarm system; trouble shooting; propulsion plant control during vessel maneuvering and etc. In addition to training in practical skills, the simulator allows the students to learn the basic principles of the structure, functions and interaction of propulsion plant components and systems.

The simulator training does not only enable the students to acquire the necessary experience in operation of different propulsion systems, but it also facilitates simulation of numerous virtual situations, thus stimulating the students intellectual creativity and response to any malfunction, error or breakdown they may experience in navigation.

 

The Faculty of Maritime Studies has got three engine room simulators:

  • Norcontrol DPS 100
  • Norcontrol PPT 2000
  • Transas ERS 4000 ver. 7.3

 

Norcontrol DPS 100engine room simulator was installed at the Faculty of Maritime Studies in 1998 and at that time it was the only simulator of that kind in the Mediterranean. It is made up of three compartments: a parameter setting room, the system display room and a computer read-out room of both numeric and graphic data. The simulator classroom capacity is for approximately 10 students.

The simulator composition corresponds to the standard configuration of a 100 000 dwt VLCC tanker. The engine room consists of a slow speed two stroke main propulsion engine type MAN B&W 6 MC 90 with all necessary auxiliary systems: auxiliary steam boiler, exhaust gas boiler, two diesel generators, one turbo generator and one shaft generator. The cargo system consists of three steam turbine driven centrifugal cargo pumps, one steam turbine driven ballast pump and the inert gas system with oxygen control and monitoring system.

Norcontrol PPT 2000 engine room simulator was installed in 2000 year. It is a computer-aided system with one instructor consol and four student consoles. The simulator offers three possible training options (modules): a slow-speed diesel engine propulsion, a diesel-electric propulsion and a crude oil tanker cargo handling system. The optimum simulator classroom capacity is 2 students per console and maximum capacity is 12 students.

 

Module 1composition consists of an engine room and cargo handling systems that correspond to the configuration of a 150 000 dwt VLCC tanker. Engine room consists of a five cylinder slow speed diesel main propulsion engine type MAN B&W LMC 90 with auxiliary systems. Module comprises steam generation system with a double pressure D type auxiliary boiler with two burners, exhaust gas boiler, condensate and feed water system. Bridge control, steering gear system and waste heat recovery systemare also included in the module. Electrical system comprises two diesel generators, one turbo generator, one shaft generator and 180 kW emergency generator.The cargo system consists of four steam turbine driven centrifugal cargo pumps, one steam turbine driven ballast pump and the inert gas system. Cargo handling system is included in another module.

 

Module 2includes simulation of inert gas distribution, cargo and ballast handling systems (loading, discharging, ballasting and deballasting) on the same ship (VLCC tanker). Module also includes stability and stress analysis simulation.

 

Module 3includes cruising passenger ship with diesel-electric propulsion with auxiliary systems (4400V/60Hz).

 

Transas ERS 4000 ver. 7.3simulator was installed in 2007 year. It is also a computer-aided system with one instructor consol and six student consoles. The simulator offers two possible training options (modules): slow-speed diesel engine propulsion of crude oil tanker and steam propulsion plant for LNG tanker. The maximum capacity for the simulator classroom is 14 students.

Module 1simulates 65 000 dwt LCC tanker with a MAN B&W 6 S 60 diesel engine and all necessary auxiliary systems. The electrical plant includes main switchboard, two diesel generators, one turbo generator, one shaft generator, an emergency switchboard, a shore supply switchboard and power transformers. Auxiliary plant includes steam plant system, ballast system, bilge water system, steering gear system, water desalination plant, sewage treatment system, incinerator, inert gas system, fire alarm system, foam and CO2 systems, provision cooling and air conditioning system.

Module 2simulates 137 585 m3 LNG tanker with a 29540 kW cross-compound, double reduction geared main propulsion steam turbine type Kawasaki UA – 400. The propulsion plant also includes two Mitsubishi main water tube boilers with dual fuel burners and internal economizers, two turbo generators and one diesel generator. The electrical plant voltage is 6600 V and frequency is 60 Hz. Auxiliary plant is the same as in the module 1.

Both modules include evaluation and assessment system intended for the quantitative assessment of the students’ performance during the fulfillment of an exercise.

The Instructor station software consists of three modules:

• On-line class – for teaching and monitoring the execution of exercises by the students;

• Exercise Editor – creating new exercises and editing existing ones;

• Debriefing – viewing and debriefing recorded exercises.

The engine room simulator can also be integrated with NTPro 4000 navigational simulator.

 

Provision cooling and air conditioning simulators

The Faculty of Maritime Studies also has Carrier air conditioning simulator that is used in teaching the basic principles of refrigeration technique and Elektrolux provision cooling simulator that is used in later stages in order to familiarize the students with components, control and maintenance of the plant. The Elektolux simulator includes standard provision cooling system, cascade cooling system and indirect refrigeration system.

 

 

2.7. Maritime Training Centre (MTC)

 

The Faculty of Maritime Studies Rijeka offers the following sorts of courses for acquiring watchkeeping certificates of competency as per IMO STCW Convention 1978/1995:

  • Watchkeeping Courses - STCW 1995
  • Deck Department
  • Engine-room Department
  • Marine Electronics and Maritime Communications
  • Supplementary Certificates of Competence (STCW 1995)
  • Special-purpose courses other than STCW are also offered at request
  • Custom designed courses upon request

 

The MTC’s safety certificates and diplomas are internationally recognized. Only the most highly trained instructors are employed on the courses.

The theoretical part of the courses is taught in Faculty's classrooms equipped with the latest audio-visual aids. Computer-based training sessions use the recent technology. For the practical part, which constitutes by far the larger part of most courses, there is a wide range of up-to-date equipment available, such as a simulators, launching installations for rescue capsules, a free-fall launching tower, various fast boats for rescue operations, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1.1 Education Philosophy:

Faculty of Maritime Studies, University of Rijeka, is a maritime education and training institution specialized in marine-oriented programmes at the undergraduate and graduate levels, with particular emphasis on:

- preparing officers for the seagoing career in nautical and marine engeneering studies


- shipping and transportation logistics/management 


- transport technology 


- maritime communications and marine electronics.

 

1.2 Education Goals:

The mission of the Faculty is to provide an educational and scientific environment which stimulates intellectual curiosity and fosters professional competence. Furthermore, the Faculty prepares students for research in maritime transport, maritime education and training and in the protection in the marine environment.

 

1.3 Brief History:

The first settlements in the place of today's Rijeka emerged as early as the Roman Era, probably due to the fact that even back then the coast of the Rijeka Gulf was considered a safe harbour for ships of that period, while the clear Rječina River provided an abundant supply of drinkable water. Proof of that are castrum remnants located in the city’s very centre today.

 

During the Middle Ages Rijeka based its development firstly through various opportunities provided by its good trading position, however, considering its relative proximity to large and important Italian ports, this development is rather modest. Still, in those times of frequent political and military turmoil, the significance of education was clearly recognized within the request of the city fathers for the establishment of Jesuit schools and institutes as early as 1623. Following the request the Jesuit Gymnasium commenced teaching on November 23rd, 1627, when lectures on Moral Theology had started. Keeping in mind the existence of their own library, the date marked the beginning of higher education in Rijeka. With the Charter of King Ferdinand II from July 31st, 1633, students attending the Jesuit course were granted the same rights and privileges the students of the University of Graz, Vienna and elsewhere in Europe had.

 

The next step was taken on February 4th, 1724, and it also includes the City Council, which requested the establishment of Philosophy Studies, which it would subsidize. The Emperor Karl VI gave his approval on June 1st that same year. The Faculty of Philosophy was established in 1726 as a two-year study programme. The Theological Faculty held classes intermittently from 1623, and on a regular basis as of 1728.

 

Unfortunately, the dedicated Jesuit activities were brought to an end with the termination of their Order in 1773. From then until 1780 the public Royal Academy was active. The higher education of priest apprentices was continued by the secular clergy at the Higher Philosophy and Theological College in Senj, with minor interruptions, from 1806 to 1940.

 

In the 18th and 19th century Rijeka became a significant European industrial and trade centre, whose daily was printed in four foreign languages, and a city where all European achievements were  easily accepted. Rijeka had its first printing-house as early as 1530; the Sugar Refinery and the Rope Factory started operating in 1750, the Paper Factory and the Ganz-Danubius Shipyard (today's “3. Maj”/ “3rd May” Shipyard) in 1833, the first gas plant in this part of Europe started operating in 1852, while the Petroleum Refinery in 1882. The ever-present inclination towards new technologies is underlined by the fact that the first torpedo was invented and constructed in 1866 at the Rijeka Technical Institute (in reality, a steam boiler and machine factory), while in 1866 Peter Salcher photographed the path of a bullet and thereby confirmed the Mach theory of sound barrier in Rijeka.

 

The revival of higher education in Rijeka took place in the 19th century. The Imperial Royal Naval Academy (K.u.K. Marine Akademie) was established with transference from Trieste in 1857, but just for a year, only to continue its work in 1866, until 1918. In Pula, the Imperial Royal Naval-Technical Committee (K.u.k. Marine-Technisches Komitee) existed from 1866, and the Marine Library (K.u.k. Marine-Bibliothek) from 1869.

 

In the period from 1912 to 1918 the Hungarian Royal Export Academy in Rijeka (A Fiumei Magyar Kiralyi Kiviteli Akademia) functioned as a higher level educational institution. The part-singing of Croatian, Latin, Italian, German and Hungarian languages, which had set a European tone in classrooms for centuries, faded away between two World Wars. At that point in time all higher education activity ceased to exist in Rijeka and Sušak.

 

Higher education was revived in Rijeka with the foundation of the Theological College on October 15th, 1947, the Merchant Marine College on April 4th, 1949, the Teachers School of Professional Higher Education (1953), the Hospitality and Catering School of Professional Higher Education in Opatija (1960) and especially with the founding of the Faculty of Medicine in 1955, the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (1960) and the Faculty of Economics (1961) and the Higher Technical and Civil Engineering (1969). Institutes were also opening throughout Pula and Gospić in close cooperation with higher education institutes established in Rijeka: the Higher School of Economy (1960), the Teachers School of Professional Higher Education (1961), as well as the Teachers School of Professional Higher Education in Gospić (1963).

 

Today’s University was founded on May 17th, 1973. It was active under the name of “Vladimir Bakarić” from 1983 to the early nineties, when it once again changed its name to the “University of Rijeka.” The University directed its educational and scientific activities towards the area of the then Municipal Districts of Rijeka and spread over the area of Western Croatia, especially the areas of the Istria, Lika and Gorski Kotar as well as the Kvarner Islands. The already existent higher education institutions were improved while new institutions were being established at the same time, such as the Faculty of Law (1973). The development of its members had since successfully continued, and in the early 80s the majority of them had profiled themselves into respectable scientific centres.

 

Up to the Republic of Croatia’s independence, the University of Rijeka consisted of 10 faculties (Faculties of Economics, Hospitality and Tourism Management, Civil Engineering, Medicine, Education/Pedagogy, Maritime, Law and Engineering, respectively) in Rijeka and two (the Faculties of Economics and Tourism and Faculty of Pedagogy) in Pula, followed by two University libraries (in Rijeka and Pula). At that time the Student Centre was already active within the framework of the University of Rijeka, and its main objective was taking care of the student living standard (accommodation, meals and occasional student employment). During the late nineties the Faculty of Pedagogy changed its name to the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Faculty in Pula following suit.

 

Following the Republic of Croatia’s independence and particularly its development which ensued with the end of the Croatian War of Independence the University has been provided with new possibilities and it has been striving to strengthen its educational, research and scientific capabilities. In regard to that, employment of young teachers and researchers has been particularly emphasized, as has the all-around strengthening of educational and research support and equipment. During the late nineties, the return of eminent Croatian researchers who are scattered all over the world has been set as a priority in addition to numerous young people employed at the University. At the same time, the City of Rijeka, all the while remaining a cosmopolitan city, has slowly but surely changed its identity from a one-time industrial centre towards service activities at its core. The derelict industrial edifices are morphing into valuable cultural heritage, frequently as a unique scene for numerous cultural events as well as scientific meetings. In such circumstances the University attempts to facilitate the development of a knowledge-based society thus actively participates in the development of the City of Rijeka and the Primorsko-goranska County.

 

The development of the University Campus on Trsat began in 2003 when the former military area was handed over to the University of Rijeka for further use. As a result of the handover, a new University unit was founded in 2005, namely, the Academy of Applied Art, which is the first of its kind in the Republic of Croatia. At the same time, the University of Rijeka commenced with the implementation of the Bologna Process, thus transforming and upgrading all its study programmes.

 

The year 2006 brought further restructuring changes, and therewith the Teachers School of Professional Higher Education in Rijeka became the Faculty of Teacher Education. Furthermore, in November of the same year, the Istria-based constituents separated, namely, the Faculty of Philosophy in Pula, the Faculty of Economics and Tourism “Dr. Mijo Mirković“, the Department of Teacher Training in Pula and the University Library Pula. With the development of the higher education system in the Republic of Croatia the need for founding a new university in the Northwest part of the country had arisen. Therefore, the youngest Croatian University “Juraj Dobrila“ was founded in Pula.

 

In late 2007 the University of Rijeka founded the first University Departments: the University Departments of Mathematics, Physics, Information and Computer Science as well as the University Department of Biotechnology, founded in early 2009.

 

Today the University consists of 9 faculties, an Academy of Applied Arts, 4 University Departments, a University Library and Student Centre.

 

Finally, in late 2010, along with the Academy of Applied Arts, the University Campus on Trsat gained new tenants: the Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences and Teacher Education, while the Faculty of Civil Engineering relocation as well as that of all University Departments is expected in the near future.

 

 
Structure of Institution

Departments

  • Navigation and Nautical Studies
  • Marine Engineering and Ship Power Systems
  • Marine Electronics and Communications
  • Maritime Transportation
  • Logistics and Management

 

  • Mathematics and Natural Science
  • Maritime Law
  • Foreign Languages
  • Social Studies and the Humanities

 

Teaching Staff

 

Full Professor

14

Associate Professor

7

Assistant Professor

7

Higher Voc. School Professor

5

Senior Lecturer

6

Lecturer

2

Senior Assistant

19

Assistant

2

Researcher

12

Total

74

 

 

Ph. D.

33

M. Sc.

24

B. Sc.

17

 

 

 

 

 
Ships

School ship - "Kraljica mora"

 

The school ship, named "Kraljica mora" (The Sea Queen), was launched in Vela Luka on Kor?ula Island on 13thNovember 2009. The ship was built at the local "Montmontaza Greben" shipyard. It is the first school ship made in Croatia that has been financed in total by the state budget.

The ship project was initiated by Zagreb’s "Brodarski Institute" (Shipping Institute), a development and technological institution for the Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure.

 

            General particulars:

Flag:Croatia [HR] 

Call Sign:9AA6962

IMO:9569358

MMSI:238261000

Owner: Ministry of the Sea, Transport and Infrastructure

Ship type: Loger

Speed recorded (Max / Average):11.5 / 10.7 knots

Length: 35 m

Breadth:8.55 m 8

Draught: 2.8 m

Capacity: 28 students, 4 professors and 7 crew members.

Gross Tonnage: 296 GT

Net Tonnage: 88 NT

Displacement: 378,00 t

Length Overall: 35.00 m

Height: 36.30

Materijal: Steel

Sail area: cca840,00 m2

Main engine: 2 x 373 kW at 1800 t/min 

 

 

 

 

 
Structure of Program

 

Structure of programs

The structure of programmes offers core and elective courses allowing students to materialize in various disciplines. It further contributes to students’ employability. Students are thus given the opportunity to use their knowledge and competences in real world applications.

Quality assurance and quality enhancement at the Faculty of Maritime Studies is compatible and comparable with standards in the European system of higher education, the Bologna Declaration, the strategic plans for the development of Croatian maritime industry and with teaching and training in maritime education and training institutions around the world.

The programmes promote establishment of a system of credits, lifelong learning, employability and international competitiveness. The objectives of the Bologna Declaration are thus aterialized.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practical work sessions, group discussions, individual and group presentations, term papers, tutorials, consultation hours and written assignments are key delivery methods of teaching. Lectures are based on current theory and practice and are complemented by practical work sessions, engineering simulators, field training and shipboard training as well as in appropriate cases study analyses.

BSc Degree Courses

  • Nautical Studies and Maritime Transport Technology
  • Marine Engineering
  • Marine Electronics and Communications
  • Technology of Transport
  • Logistics and Management

MSc Degree Courses

  • Nautical Studies and Maritime Transport Technology
  • Marine Engineering and Maritime Transport Technology
  • Marine Electronics and Communications
  • Technology of Transport
  • Logistics and Management

Ph.D Degree

 

Nautical Studies and Maritime Transport Technology

Aims of the Nautical Studies and Maritime Transport Technology Programme are:

  • to promote lifelong training to meet the requirements for certification of marine officers: Chief Mate andMaster on ships of 3.000 gross tonnage or more,
  • to promote lifelong learning in line with the STCW 1979/95 Convention and the EU METNET projects,
  • to raise awareness of the importance of safety at sea and environmental protection,
  • to promote quality assurance in maritime education and training institutions (within the system of higher education) in line with the Bologna Declaration, European and world standards of teaching and research,
  • to foster scientific approach to the revival of the Croatian maritime economy.

Basic characteristics of the programme are:

  • it is comparable and compatible with similar programmes in Europe and around the world,
  • the degrees are readable and comparable ‘in order to promote European citizens employability and the international competitiveness of the European higher education system’ (the Bologna Declaration, 1999),
  • it fosters a blend of theory and practice in teaching.

The programme meets the following requirements:

  • compatibility with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95 and The Code of Ranks and Certificates for Seafarers’ Training on Merchant Ships in the Republic of Croatia (the Official Gazette No. 8/02, 5/03 and 16/03),
  • teaching staff with qualifications in line with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95 and  The Code of Ranks and Certificates for Seafarers’ Training on Merchant Ships in the Republic of Croatia (the Official Gazette No. 8/02, 5/03 and 16/03),
  • highest quality standards in terms of premises, classrooms, specialised classrooms, study area,  IT, the library and equipment (a navigation simulator and a training vessel),

In conclusion, the first two years of the undergraduate level are in accordance with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95. After the completion of the first and the second year, and upon a documentary evidence of the completed first two years, students are eligible for sea-training, and for taking exams leading to the certificates of competency: Chief Mate andMaster of a ship of 3.000 gross tonnage or more. Students earn the national certificates upon the completion of the undergraduate cycles.

 

 

 

Undergraduate study - Nautical studies and maritime transport technology (the first tier - three year study)

 

I.semesterCompulsory courses: Maritime English I, Mathematics I, Engineering mechanics, Applied computer science, Marine electrical engineering, Cargoes carried by sea, Marine meteorology and ocean science, Ship design and construction, Physical training

II. semesterCompulsory courses: Maritime English I, Mathematics II, Ship design and construction, Law of the sea and administrative law, Safety at sea, Marine propulsion plants and ship systems, Shipping economics, Marine environment protection, Physical training, Practical seamanship

III. semesterCompulsory courses: Maritime English II, Coastal navigation, Electronic navigation, Ship handling, Cargo handling , Ship organization and personal management, Maritime communication, Physical training

IV. semesterCompulsory courses: Maritime English II, Shipping law, Astronomical navigation, Cargo handling, Voyage planning, Ship maintenance, Marine medicine, Physical training, On-board training

Optional courses (V. semester): Maritime English III, Mathematics III

Optional courses (VI. Semester): Maritime English III, B.Sc. Essay

Optional courses:Commercial law, Terotechnology, Forwarding and shipping agencies, Trade routes, Carriage of liquid cargoes by sea, Container and ro-ro transport, Ports and Terminals, Transport management, Electronic commerce, Statistics, Transport insurance,

Transport of bulk and special cargo, Passenger transport by sea, Land transport technology,

Economics of maritime systems, Logistics in transport, Automation in transport

 

 

Graduate study NAUTICAL STUDIES AND MARITIME TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGY (second tier – two-year programme)

I. Semester: Applied mathematics, Research work methodology, Marine technologies

II. Semester: Integrated and multimodal transport, International maritime safety system, Quality management in maritime industry

III. Semester: Modeling and simulations , Coastal zone management

IV. Semester: MSc thesis

Optional courses by module:

MODULE – NAUTICAL SCIENCES: Risk management in shipping, Maritime aspect of ports and waterways design, Marine accidents investigation

MODULE – ECOLOGY OF THE SEA AND MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION: Ecology of the sea, Environmental law, Pollution control

MODULE – MARITIME INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT: Financing in maritime industry, Business operations in shipping, Chartering

 

MODULE – TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS: Controlling technical systems, Computer management of ship systems, Marine electrical power systems

Optional courses: Operational researches, Human resources management, Project management, Transport law of the EU, Management information systems, Business communications

 

Optional courses that can be chosen in one of the proposed semester are as follows:

Ecology in transport, Strategic marketing and management, International business operations, Supply chain management , Technological processes in transport, Land transport planning, History of navigation, Ship certification and surveying , Ship stability*, Planning of carriage goods by sea, Ship’s hydrodynamics, Port and shore structures, Nautical tourism, Port business operation, Business organizations, Customs, Technical systems reliability and safety , Planning and designing transport terminals, Intelligent transport systems.

 

Marine Engineering

Aims of the Marine Engineering and Maritime Transport Technology are:

  • To educate and train students for highest ranks on board, i.e. for: Second Marine Engineer Officer and Chief Engineer on board ships of 3.000 kW output or more, for Croatian and world shipping market;
  • to raise awareness of the importance of safety of life at sea and environmental protection in the system of continuous education and training scheme;
  • to foster scientific approach to the revival of the Croatian maritime economy.
  • to promote quality assurance in maritime training institutions (within the system of higher education) in line with the Bologna Declaration, European and world standards of teaching and research;
  • to promote lifelong learning in line with the STCW 1979/95 Convention and EU METNET projects

Basic characteristics of the programme are:

  • it is comparable and compatible with similar programmes in Europe and around the world,
  • the degrees are readable and comparable,
  • it fosters a blend of theory and practice in teaching.

Courses in the first two years are in line with the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95. They provide sound knowledge and competence for the certificates of competency: Second Marine Engineer and Chief Engineerof a ship of 3.000 kW output or more.

 

The undergraduate programme is confirmed by the rigorous process of external assessment. It must be granted accreditation by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport, National Council for Higher Education, and the Ministry of Sea, Tourism, Transport and Development. The programme meets the following requirements:

  • compatibility with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95 and The Code of Ranks and Certificates for Seafarers’ Training on Merchant Ships in the Republic of Croatia (Official Gazette No. 8/02, 5/03 and 16/03),
  • teaching staff with qualifications in line with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95 and  The Code of Ranks and Certificates for Seafarers’ Training on Merchant Ships in the Republic of Croatia (Official Gazette No. 8/02, 5/03 and 16/03),
  • highest quality standards in terms of premises, classrooms, specialised classrooms, study area,  IT, the library and equipment (marine engineering simulator, refrigeration plant simulator, computer-aided marine engineering plant simulator, load master and steam plant simulator),
  • ISO 9001:2000 certificate of quality standards. The certificate is recognised by the Ministry of Sea, Tourism, Transport and Development.

In conclusion, the first two years of the undergraduate level are in accordance with the Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) 78/95. After the completion of the first and the second year, and upon a documentary evidence of the completed first two years, students are eligible for sea-training, and for taking exams leading to the certificates of competency: Second Marine Engineer and Chief Engineer of a ship of 3.000 kW output or more. Students earn the certificates upon the completion of the undergraduate cycles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 
On-Board Trainig Scheme

In compliance with STCW - 78/95 requirements (International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978, as amended in 1995, Chapter ? - II/1 - Master and Deck Department; ? - III - (1 - Engine Department, ?-IV/2 – Radio Communication and Radio Personnel), all cadets undergo their shipboard training during the process of education.

 

At the Faculty of Maritime Studies in Rijeka, both navigation and marine engineering cadets have courses in the first two years during which they undergo approximately 1 month of seagoing experience on the school ships:

  • “KRALJICA MORA”
  • “NAŠE MORE”
  • Passenger ships owned by national passenger liner JADROLINIJA”.

 

Besides shipboard training, marine engineering cadets have training at the Faculty's workshop and at ship-repairing yards:

  • “3. Maj”, Rijeka
  • “Viktor Lenac”, Kostrena
  • “Kraljevica”, Kraljevica.